Pakistan’s Financial Services Sector

Courtesy: South Asia Investor Review


Pakistan has been ranked 34 out of 52 countries in the World Economic Forum’s first Financial Development Report, which was released in Pakistan through the Competitiveness Support Fund (CSF) in December, 2008.

The report is a comprehensive analysis of financial systems and capital markets in 52 countries that explores key drivers of financial system development and economic growth in developing and developed countries and serves as a tool by which countries can benchmark themselves and establish priorities for financial system improvement.

Pakistan’s Banking sector turned profitable in 2002. Their profits continued to rise for the next five years and peaked to Rs 84.1 ($1.1 billion) billion in 2006.

Arthur Bayhan, Chief Executive of the Competitiveness Support, told the media: “I am very happy to see that financial system in Pakistan is well reformed and competitive vis-à-vis Asia and Europe. Pakistan is ranked ahead of the Russian Federation (35), Indonesia (38), Turkey (39), Poland (41), Brazil (40), Philippines (48) and Kazakhstan (45).”

The United States narrowly edged the United Kingdom to take the top position in the Financial Development Index. The United Kingdom was second while China ranked 24 and India 31.

The Financial Development Index is based on three main pillars – Factors, Policies and Institutions, Financial Intermediation and Capital Availability and Access. These are further divided into sub – pillars.

Under Factors, Policies and Institutions pillar, Pakistan ranks 49th in institutional environment, 50th in business environment and 37th in Financial Stability. In the Financial Intermediation Pillar Pakistan ranks 25th in banks, 42nd in non banks and 17th in Financial Markets. Under Capital Availability and Access, Pakistan ranks 33rd.

Indicators showed that in business environment Pakistan had development advantage in Cost to Export, ranking 6th, Cost of closing business 5th.

In Financial Stability Change in Real Effective Exchange rate ranked 20th, External debt to GDP 10th, Frequency of banking crises 1st, stability index 15th.

In corporate governance Pakistan ranked at the very top in shareholder rights index, 14th in strength of investor protection.

In the Non banks pillar, Pakistan ranked 9th in the Real growth of direct insurance premiums. In equity market movement Pakistan ranked at the top again in equity market turnover.

Importance of Financial Services Sector:

Banks are often described as a nation’s economic engine, in part because they provide financial intermediation functions between savers/investors who are looking for safety and growth and consumers/businesses who are looking for access to credit and capital.Banks also play a major role as instruments of the government’s monetary policy aimed at regulating interest rates and money supply in the economy. The current economic crisis in the United States and Europe, marked by the ongoing weakness of major banks and the resulting credit and capital crunch, underlines the critical importance of the banking sector in national and global economies. Recognizing the crucial importance of the financial sector in global economic recovery, the Obama administration is allocating the bulk of the stimulus money to restore the health of major U.S. banks.

Financial Stability Review 2007-08 released by the State Bank of Pakistan

Pakistan’s banking sector has remained remarkably strong and resilient, despite facing pressures emanating from weakening macroeconomic environment since late 2007, said the SBP report. While financial markets (money market and foreign exchange market) remained resilient to developments in the macroeconomic environment and functioned well in maintaining financial stability, the imposition of the floor of 9,144 points on the KSE-100 index in August 2008 has adversely impacted investor sentiments by effectively blocking the exit mechanism generally taken for granted in a market based system.

The review said the banking system is on strong footing and has long term potential – a feature which has served to attract a substantial amount of FDI in the sector, with established global financial institutions now active participants in the domestic financial sector. FDI increased from a mere $1 billion in 1999 to $8.4 billion in 2007.

Stress tests conducted on June-2008 data indicate that the large banks are relatively robust, with the medium and small-sized banks positioning themselves in niche markets, it added. Capital adequacy of the banking system is strong, 12.1% at end-June 2008, well above the internationally acceptable minimum requirement of 8.0%, it said and added core capital constitutes about 80.0% of the total capital, and Tier 1 to risk weighted assets ratio of the banking system is at 9.7%. [Link]

 

Profitability of Banking Sector

Profitability of the banking system continues to be impressive, largely emanating from the persistent growth in high-yield earning assets and expanded business volumes.

Banking sector turned profitable in 2002. Their profits continued to rise for the next five years and peaked to Rs 84.1 ($1.1 billion) billion in 2006. Apart from 2003 when profits were mainly generated through capital gains, the banks’ net earnings growth in rest of the years after 2003, were primarily driven by core business activities.

Net interest income of the 22 listed banks increased by 19 percent to Rs 206.6 billion, attributable to stable spreads observed during the years along with a 17 percent growth in advances that was spurred by banks’ lending for circular debt and commodity operations.

Unfortunately in 2008, Profitability of Pakistan’s banking sector declined sharply, owing to multiple reasons, reflecting the deteriorating economic conditions of the country. Profits of 22 listed banks, which have so far announced their results, declined by 21 percent to Rs 50 billion in 2008 from Rs 64 billion in 2007. The 22 banks represent 96 percent of the sector’s market capitalization and constitute 82 percent of the overall industry’s total assets. [Link]

Banking in Pakistan:

List of Banks in Pakistan

Between 2002 and 2007, Pakistan’s accelerated economic growth was underpinned by a strong banking sector. Classified as Pakistan’s and region’s best performing sector, the banking industry’s assets rose to over $60 billion, its profitability remains high, non-performing loans (NPLs) are low, credit is fairly diversified and bank-wide system risks are well-contained. Almost 81% of banking assets are in private hands. Likewise, the present foreign stake comes to 47% of total paid-up capital of all the financial institutions regulated by Pakistan’s central bank, the State Bank of Pakistan.

Pakistan’s foreign reserves hit a record high of $16.5 billion in October 2007 but fell to $6.6 billion in November, largely because of a soaring import bill. As the commodity prices rose and inflation in Pakistan reached near 25%, the State Bank of Pakistan was forced to raise its discount rates to as high as 15%. However, there has been a dramatic decline in the cost of imports such as oil during the last few months, spelling relief for Pakistan and other non-OPEC developing nations. The price of oil has dropped to about a quarter of what it was last summer.

Pakistan signed a $7.6 billion loan agreement with the International Monetary Fund in November to stave off a balance of payments crisis. It received its first tranche of $3.1 billion that month. In its first assessment since November, IMF has expressed satisfaction with Pakistan’s progress. “Initial developments under the program have been positive,” IMF spokesman David Hawley told a regular news briefing, according to Pakistan’s Dawn newspaper. “The foreign exchange rate has appreciated somewhat and preliminary information suggests that end-December targets for net international reserves and net domestic assets at the State Bank of Pakistan were met,” he added.

Pakistan’s economy deteriorated sharply over the course of 2008, as inflation surged, and the current account deficits jumped on the back of rising oil and food prices, according to a World Bank report.

The report titled ‘Global Economic Prospects 2009’ says political turmoil and ongoing security concerns have also taken a toll on Pakistan’s economy, while the global financial crisis added substantial downward pressures on its financial markets. Pakistan and the International Monetary Fund agreed to lower the target for the gross domestic growth this fiscal year to 2.5 per cent from 3.5 per cent but many analysts said even achieving this target would be very ambitious.

The general deterioration in regional trade balances has been offset by large remittance inflows, which represent a sizable, and generally increasing share of GDP: during 2007, 14 per cent in Nepal, 8 per cent in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, 4 per cent in Pakistan, and 3 per cent in India.

Given strong underlying growth dynamics in South Asia, the negative feedback effects of the global financial crisis are expected to be temporary. A relatively rapid rebound is expected in 2010, with a projected revival of GDP growth to 7.2 per cent.

During 2001-2007, former Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz, a banker by training and extensive experience in New York, understood the role of banking, finance, investment and consumer credit in economic growth of a nation. He focused on building strong banking, investment and finance sectors in Pakistan to underpin its economy. He strengthened capital availability, an essential and increasingly important economic input, in addition to labor and land improvements. With higher education budget up 15-fold and overall education spending up 36% in two years, he focused on education to improve the availability of skilled labor to fill new jobs. He pushed land development and public and private construction spending to improve infrastructure and facilities to attract greater business investment and create jobs. Mr. Aziz was largely successful in his efforts.

In general, there are primarily two types of banks in Pakistan: Commercial Banks and Investment Banks. Both types of banks provide financial services essential for Pakistan’s economy to function and grow.

Commercial Banks:

Commercial Banks are privately-owned institutions that, generally, accept deposits and make loans. Deposits are money people entrust to an institution with the understanding that they can get it back at any time or at an agreed-upon future date. A loan is money let out to a borrower to be generally paid back with interest. This action of taking deposits and making loans is called financial intermediation. A bank’s business, however, does not end there.

Most people and businesses pay their bills with bank checking accounts, placing banks at the center of our payments system. Banks are the major source of consumer loans — loans for cars, houses, education — as well as main lenders to businesses, especially small businesses. When banks are strong and the credit flows, it helps the overall economic growth. When banks are in crisis, the impact on business and consumers multiplies the weakness in the economy.

Investment Banks:

Investment banks provide four primary types of services: raising capital (private equity or public offerings of shares), advising in mergers and acquisitions, executing securities sales and trading, and performing general advisory services. Most of the major Wall Street firms are active in each of these categories. Smaller investment banks may specialize in two or three of these categories.

Finance Expo 2009:

Finance Expo Pakistan 2009 Exhibition was held last week in Karachi to showcase the most competent, dynamically growing and innovative companies that demonstrate the latest financial systems and methods stimulating the development of the banking and finance industry.

The Expo was an opportunity to network with decision makers, economists and experts of Banks, Takaful, Modaraba, Insurance Companies, Asset Management Companies, Stock Exchanges, Security Companies, Financial Education Institutes, & Leasing Companies and also of the fast growing industries like IT & Telecom, Oil & Gas, Alternative Energy & Power Industries, Agriculture, Pharma, Textile, Builders & Developers, Auto as well as Media.

The event is a platform for banking and financial institutions to come together and share ideas and the challenges presented to this rapidly growing industry.

The exhibition and conference highlighted the value that banking, financial institutions and other revenue generating industries bring to boost the economy of Pakistan. Moreover, the Event presents opportunities for displaying products, services and solutions towards the potential buyers.

Summary:

In spite of the international economic crisis, continuing political turmoil and rising militancy in Pakistan, the financial services sector has held up fairly well in the last year. Its future, however, remains tied to a measure political stability in the country that allows economic activity to occur unhindered. Let’s hope the nation’s political and ruling elites can find a way to find a peaceful way forward.

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7 Comments

Filed under Financial Institutions, Investment, Pakistan Economy

7 responses to “Pakistan’s Financial Services Sector

  1. Administrator

    Pakistan’s banking industry has tremendous potential: Salim

    KARACHI: Governor State Bank of Pakistan Syed Salim Raza has said that Pakistan’s banking industry had tremendous potential for further investment in the financial sector of the country. Inaugurating the third branch of Barclays Bank in Karachi at Khayaban-e-Shahbaz, he said that continued interest of international investors in the banking industry of Pakistan was a good omen and that it reflected the immense potential of the country, specifically in the financial sector.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=20094\15\story_15-4-2009_pg5_6

  2. Administrator

    “JS Bank also interested in acquiring RBS Pakistan”

    KARACHI: Following MCB Bank and Habib Bank Limited, JS Bank has also expressed interest in acquiring RBS Pakistan. JS Bank Limited has been formed after the merger and amalgamation of Jahangir Siddiqui Investment Bank Limited and commercial banking operations of American Express Bank Ltd Pakistan. JS Bank Limited commenced operations in Pakistan as a fully scheduled bank on December 30, 2006. According to its website, the total number of branches reached twenty-four.

    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=20094\15\story_15-4-2009_pg5_5

  3. Peter Stoloff

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  5. Thorough knowledge is provided here about Pakistan Industries.

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