Category Archives: Investment

Economic Indicators 1999-2009

Updated June 2010!

 

Compiled by: Mirza Rohail B and Afreen Baig

 

Pak Economy in 1999 was: $ 75 billion (Source)
Pak Economy in 2007 is: $ 160 billion (Source) and (Source)
Pak Economy in 2008 is: $ 170 billion (Source) and (Source)

GDP Growth in 1999: 3.1 % (Source)

GDP Growth in 2005: 8.4 % (Source)

GDP Growth in 2007: 7 % (Source) and (Source)

GDP Growth in 2009: 2 % (Source) and (Source)

 

GDP Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) in 1999: $ 270 billion (Source)
GDP Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) in 2007: $ 475.5 billion (
Source)
GDP Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) in 2008: $ 504.3 billion (
Source)

 

GDP per Capita Income in 1999: $ 450 (Source)
GDP per Capita Income in 2007: $ 926
(Source)

GDP per Capita Income in 2008: $1085 (Source)

 

Pak revenue collection 1999: Rs. 305 billion (Source)
Pak revenue collection 2007: Rs. 708 billion (
Source) and (Source)

Pak revenue collection 2008: Rs. 990 billion (Source)

Pak revenue collection 2009: Rs. 1150 billion (Source) and (Source)

 

Pak Foreign reserves in 1999: $ 1.96 billion (Source)
Pak Foreign reserves in 2007: $ 16.4 billion (
Source) and (Source)

Pak Foreign reserves in 2008: $ 8.89 billion (Source)

Pak Foreign reserves in 2009: $ 14.3 billion (Source)

 

Pak Exports in 1999: $ 8 billion (Source) and (Source)
Pak Exports in 2007: $ 18.5 billion (
Source)

Pak Exports in 2008: $ 19.22 billion (Source) and (Source)

Pak Exports in 2009: $ 17.78 billion (Source) & (Source) & (Source)

 

Textile Exports in 1999: $ 5.5 billion
Textile Exports in 2007: $ 11.2 billion (
Source)

 

KHI stock exchange 1999: $ 5 billion at 700 points
KHI stock exchange 2007: $ 75 billion at 14,000 points (
Source)
KHI stock exchange 2008: $ 46 billion at 9,300 points (
Source) and $ 20 billion at 4,972 points (Source)

KHI stock exchange 2009: $ 26.5 billion (Source) at 9,000 points (Source)

 

Foreign Investment in 1999: $ 301 million (Source)
Foreign Investment in 2007: $ 8.4 billion (
Source)

Foreign Investment in 2008: $ 5.19 billion (Source)

 

Large Scale Manufacturing (LSM) in 1999: 1.5% ( Source)

Large Scale Manufacturing (LSM) in 2005: 19.9% (Source)

Large Scale Manufacturing (LSM) in 2007: 8.6% (Source)

Large Scale Manufacturing (LSM) in 2008: 4.8%  (Source)

Large Scale Manufacturing (LSM) in 2009: (-8.2 %) (Source)

 

Debt (External Debt & Liabilities) in 1988: $ 18 billion

Debt (External Debt & Liabilities) in 1999: $ 39 billion (Source)  (Source)  (Source)

Debt (External Debt & Liabilities) in 2007: $ 40.5 billion (Source) and (Source)

Debt (External Debt & Liabilities) in 2009: $ 52 billion (Source) & (Source)

 

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Filed under Industrial sector, Investment, Musharraf Era, Pakistan Economy, Statistics & Indicators, Textile

The Realistic Prospects for Investment in Pakistan

Courtesy: VISION21

By, Afreen Baig

Budget 2010-11 has come with many promises to reform the economy. The government has set forth few objectives for it to achieve. The 7th objective is a resolve to make the country ‘fertile for investment’, with whatever limited resources available.

If an economy runs towards economic imbalance, stagnation or recession, or if one has to kick start a new economy, there are two main options any government has. First, the government along-with the Central bank pledges to pump in direct money to start the circulation cycle. Recent examples of this are the US government’s pledge for the ‘rescue package’ worth roughly $12 trillion towards the economy. Similarly UK government spent nearly a trillion Pound to bail out and refinance its bank through ‘Quantitative Easing’. Likewise, Japan also launched above $350 billion stimulus packages, to lift its economy out of the recent recession and over the past decade of its economic stagflation it has taken several such smaller initiatives to stimulate the economy. All these measure will fall under what is termed as Keynesian thesis after J M Keynes. Alternatively, one may call these Deficit financing. The idea is that the government uses its resources to increase consumption and liquidity which in turn increases demand and economic activity resulting in increased jobs and employment.

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Data: Board of Investment

Foreign Investment:  boi

 

2001-02: $475 million

2002-03: $820 million

2003-04: $922 million

2004-05: $ 1.677 billion

2005-06: $ 3.872 billion
2006-07: $ 8.417 billion
2007-08: $ 5.193 billion

 

Exports – Imports = Trade deficit/surplus 

 

2001-02: $ 9.13 bn — $10.34 bn = $1.2 billion

2002-03: $11.16 bn — $12.22 bn = $1.06 billion

2003-04: $12.31 bn — $15.59 bn = $3.28 billion

2004-05: $14.39 bn — $20.6 bn = $6.21 billion

2005-06: $16.47 bn — $28.58 bn = $12.11 billion

2006-07: $17.01 bn — $30.54 bn = $13.53 billion

2007-08: $19.22 bn — $39.96 bn = $ 20.74 billion

 

 

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Filed under Investment, Pakistan Economy, Statistics & Indicators

Communication Industry

Compiled by: Mirza Rohail B

Pakistan is on the verge of Telecom revolution. Pakistan Telecommunications Authority (PTA) in 2004 introduced  two types of license for ISPs – regional and nationwide, and also exempted them from Central Excise Duty. Since liberalization, over the past four years, the Pakistani telecom sector has attracted more than $9 billion in foreign investments. During 2007-08, the Pakistani Communication sector alone received $ 1.62 billion in Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) – about 30% of the country’s total foreign direct investment. 

telecom-national-exchequer

By March 2009, Pakistan had 91 million mobile subscribers – 25 million more subscribers than reported in the same period 2008. In addition to 3.1 million fixed lines, while as many as 2.4 million are using Wireless Local Loop connections.

Pakistan is ranked 4th in terms of broadband Internet growth in the world, as the subscriber base of broadband Internet has been increasing rapidly with the total base crossing 170,000 in the country. The rankings are released by Point Topic Global broadband analysis, a global research centre.

Pakistan according to PC World was amongst those top five countries with the highest SMS traffic processed with 763 million SMS during 2008-09. In terms of year-on-year growth, Pakistan traffic volume grew by 253 percent compared to last year during the same period.

The contribution of telecom sector to the national exchequer increased to Rs 110 billion in the year 2007-08 on account of general sales tax, activation charges and other steps as compared to Rs 100 billion in the year 2006-07.

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Filed under Industrial sector, Investment, Pakistan Economy, Telecom and I.T Industry

Foreign Investment

Pakistan is now the most investment-friendly nation in South Asia. Business regulations have been profoundly overhauled  foreign-investmentalong liberal lines, especially since 1999. Most barriers to the flow of capital and international direct investment have been removed. Foreign investors do not face any restrictions on the inflow of capital, and investment of up to 100% of equity participation is allowed in most sectors (local partners must be brought in within 5 years and contribute up to 40% of the equity in the services and agriculture sectors). Unlimited remittance of profits, dividends, service fees or capital is now the rule.

Business regulations are now among the most liberal in the region. This was confirmed by a World Bank report published in 2008 ranking Pakistan (at 76th) well ahead of neighbors like China (at 93rd), India (at 120th), Bangladesh (107th) and Sri Lanka (101th) based on ease of doing business.  The ranking is based on 10 indicators of business regulation that follows the time and cost to meet government requirements in business start-up, operation, trade, taxation, and closure.

The tables below also negate arguments by those that accuse Pakistan of raising foreign investment by selling off state assets.  Fact is that only $6 billion were raised by selling state assets in the past 15 years. (News)

 

 

View Detailed (Country wise and Sector wise) Facts & Figures below. Keep reading

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Filed under Investment, Pakistan Economy, Statistics & Indicators

Foreign Reserves Phenomenon: Shaukat Aziz versus PPP

Written By: Afreen Baig

 
 

 

Foreign Reserves – a significant economic indicator and of vital importance to every expanding economy. Foreign Reserves is the first and basic economic indicator that transmits an air of confidence and trust, amongst the potential foreign & local investors and the nation. Foreign Reserves are held in abundance and accumulated – in order to sustain the confidence of a country’s capacity to carry out external trade confidently, to balance the momentum between demand & supply of foreign currencies, and also used as an intervention tool by the State Bank. Reserves also bail out the economy in times of financial crisis.

By October 2007, at the end of Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz’s tenure, Pakistan raised back its Foreign Reserves to a handsome $16.4 billion. His exceptional policies kept our trade deficit controlled at $13 billion, exports boomed to $18 billion, revenue generation increased to become $13 billion and attracted foreign investment of $8.4 billion.

Pakistan recently has seen a drastic drop in its Reserves by 50% and its currency devalued by 40%, which has left ordinary people confused and the usual cynics have started heaping the blame onto the policies of Mr. Shaukat Aziz, without even knowing the basic macro-economic indicators nor understanding the relationship b/w Foreign reserves, Trade deficit and Currency devaluation.

The Trade deficit (Exports minus Imports) is always managed in ratio to Revenue generation, Capital inflows and Reserves. Almost all developing economies face the dread of trade deficit but their abundant foreign reserves gives them the fiscal space to overcome those grievances.

 

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Filed under Investment, Pakistan Economy, Shaukat Aziz

Pakistan’s Financial Services Sector

Courtesy: South Asia Investor Review


Pakistan has been ranked 34 out of 52 countries in the World Economic Forum’s first Financial Development Report, which was released in Pakistan through the Competitiveness Support Fund (CSF) in December, 2008.

The report is a comprehensive analysis of financial systems and capital markets in 52 countries that explores key drivers of financial system development and economic growth in developing and developed countries and serves as a tool by which countries can benchmark themselves and establish priorities for financial system improvement.

Pakistan’s Banking sector turned profitable in 2002. Their profits continued to rise for the next five years and peaked to Rs 84.1 ($1.1 billion) billion in 2006.

Arthur Bayhan, Chief Executive of the Competitiveness Support, told the media: “I am very happy to see that financial system in Pakistan is well reformed and competitive vis-à-vis Asia and Europe. Pakistan is ranked ahead of the Russian Federation (35), Indonesia (38), Turkey (39), Poland (41), Brazil (40), Philippines (48) and Kazakhstan (45).”

The United States narrowly edged the United Kingdom to take the top position in the Financial Development Index. The United Kingdom was second while China ranked 24 and India 31.

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Filed under Financial Institutions, Investment, Pakistan Economy